Hard to Change Minds of ‘Vaccine-Hesitant’ Parents


By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter


WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) — When parents have concerns about the safety of childhood vaccinations, it can be tough to change their minds, as a new study shows.


The study involved “vaccine-hesitant” parents — a group distinct from the staunch “anti-vaxxer” crowd. They have worries about one or more routine vaccines, and question whether the benefits for their child are worthwhile.


Even though those parents are not “adamantly” opposed to vaccinations, it can still be hard for pediatricians to allay their concerns, said Jason Glanz, lead researcher on the study.


So Glanz and his colleagues looked at whether giving parents more information — online material “tailored” to their specific concerns — might help.


It didn’t. Parents who received the information were no more likely to have their babies up to date on vaccinations than other parents were, the study found.


The news was not all bad. Overall, more than 90% of babies in the study were all caught up on vaccinations.


So it may have been difficult to improve upon those numbers, according to Glanz, who is based at Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s Institute for Health Research in Aurora.


But, he said, it’s also possible the customized information reinforced some parents’ worries.


“It might have done more harm than good,” Glanz said.


That’s because among vaccine-hesitant parents, those who were directed to general information that was not tailored, had the highest vaccination rates — at 88%.


The findings were published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.


Childhood vaccination rates in the United States are generally high. But studies show that about 10% of parents either delay or refuse vaccinations for their kids — generally over safety worries.


Routine childhood vaccines have a long history of safe use, Glanz said, but some parents have questions. They may have heard that certain ingredients in vaccines are not safe, or worry that their baby is being given “too many” immunizations in a short time.


And during a busy pediatrician visit, Glanz said, it can be hard to address all those questions.


So his team tested a web-based tactic to augment routine checkups. They randomly assigned 824 pregnant women and new parents to one of three groups: One received standard vaccine information from their pediatrician; another was directed to the study website for additional, but general, information on immunizations; and the third received tailored information from the website.



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